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How to Plan Your Family’s Christmas Ski Vacation

Taking your family out for an awesome skiing and snowboarding holiday experience? It’s one of the best Christmas vacations that you will find. However, you’ll need to be prepared, especially if it’s your first time. Hitting the slopes is a lot of fun, but it can be dangerous if you don’t take the necessary precautions. Here are some tips you should remember for planning your family’s Christmas ski vacation…

Choose Your Locale

If you don’t have much experience with skiing or snowboarding, pay special attention to where you book your vacation. Some resorts are made specifically to accommodate more advanced skiers, so look for a place with a good bunny hill and more easy and intermediate courses than advanced ones. They can also vary wildly in price, so you’ll need to make sure that it fits your budget. Also, check out the resort to make sure that it’s a friendly environment for all members of your party. The real crown jewel is if you can plan to rent ski-in/ski-out property to stay in by the property.

Schedule a Lesson

Even if you’ve been skiing or snowboarding before, don’t take the lift to the top of the mountain without taking a lesson first. Find a resort that offers lessons and schedule one for yourself and any others in your party who need it. Many offer them free as a part of your vacation package; others will ask for a small fee, but it’s well worth it. You’ll be a lot safer and have a lot more fun if you go take this important step. 

Be In Shape

Skiing and snowboarding aren’t actually all downhill. On occasion, you’ll have to push yourself along with your poles or arms. You’ll also need some core strength to stay balanced and make turns. Make sure that your body is fit enough to do so before you hit the slopes. 

Be Prepared for the Real Thing

Many people find it helpful to brush up on the technique of the sport before they try it themselves. You could look into booking a private lesson at an indoor slope or watch training videos for advice before your trip so that you’re as prepared for the real thing as possible. 

Gear Up

Experts recommend that you don’t borrow your gear, as it is fitted specifically to the owner and might not fit you properly. Renting is a good option, but for the best experience possible, you’ll want to buy your own gear. You’ll need your skis and poles or snowboard, the boots that attach to that gear, a good pair of high socks, snow pants, a ski jacket, goggles, and a hat. Those are the basics, and you won’t regret purchasing them. 

Pack a Bag

Bring a small rucksack that you can take with you on the trail. As the day goes on, you might find yourself getting warmer or colder, and you should have the means to add or shed layers wherever you are. You’ll also want to have an emergency kit and some water and snacks in there as well. 

Check the Weather

The heavier the snowfall, the better the skiing or snowboarding, but that doesn’t mean you want to be on the slopes during a heavy blizzard. Know what the weather is forecasted to be before you schedule your trip to minimize the chance of you getting stuck in unpleasant and dangerous conditions on the slope. Another important thing to remember about the weather is that it will affect your drive up to the resort. Winter driving can be incredibly dangerous, so make sure that you have a car that is winter-ready.

Hydrate and Snack

Carry plenty of water and snacks with you in your pack and use them! Though it seems like you will mostly be gliding down the slopes, skiing and snowboarding is hard work, and you keep your body hydrated and fed to keep going. You’ll also want to have this in case of an emergency. 

Wear Sunscreen

Just because it’s cold does not mean that you are safe from the sun. On the contrary, the effects of the sun are actually worse when you ski than it is when you go to the beach. The sun reflects off the snow and hits your skin with doubled force. Protect any exposed skin by slathering it in a high SPF sunscreen several times a day. 

Exercise Caution on the Slopes

Accidents happen to the best of skiers and snowboarders, but a lot of them can be prevented if you’re cautious. Read all the signs on each hill you encounter to make sure the terrain is at your level. Don’t go on a slope that you aren’t ready for. Be prepared in case of accidents. Above all, listen to the advice of your instructor, and if you have a question, ask. This is your best bet for a fun-filled and accident-free holiday on the slopes!

Getting Involved Your First Semester on Campus

our first semester away for college is one of the most exciting times. You are moving out of your parents’ house, you are finally on your own, and just imagine the new social life you are bound to be part of. Since there is a lot going on around campus find something you know you’re going to enjoy! If you get overwhelmed, ask your friends and roommates if they are interested in something specific and you can tag along with them. We’ve got a couple of tips and things to look and be prepared for during that first semester. 

Get a Student Pass for Games and Activities

Since most college campuses’ have a sports team this gives you the opportunity to sign up for a student pass to the student section of various sporting events and activities. Being in the student section in the middle of some serious school spirit is a great chance to meet new friends that you can go to future activities with. They may even know about more events that you are interested in that you may have missed. 

Check out the Campus Calendar

There’s usually always something going on around campus. Whether it is homecoming parties and activities or a block party put on by different houses or dorms that you can go to with friends or roommates. These events usually have activities, lots of new people to meet and free food. When living alone for the first time and learning to budget, free food is a great thing to happen upon at parties. Some parties will even have so much leftover food they start sending it home with party-goers. Grab some and take it home and box it up in your Tupperware for a meal later in the week!

Stay Healthy

Staying healthy when you’re living away from home for the first time especially if you’re not used to doing grocery shopping on your own and making your own meals. One way to keep yourself accountable is to ask your roommates for help. You can go grocery shopping together and rotate making dinners for everyone throughout the week. Perhaps one of your roommates is studying nutrition and they could help you make a meal plan and grocery list! But staying and eating healthy will be easier if you are doing it with people around you and you aren’t alone! Eating healthy and clean food has also been proven to help keep focus and keeping your energy up and is more sustainable than endless amounts of energy drinks and shots while you’re trying to study for a big test coming up. 

Stay Fit

Most college campuses’ have a gym on campus and offer a lot of different, and occasionally free, classes that you can get involved in. Ask your friends and roommates if they want to go with you to these classes so you don’t have to go alone. Whether it is just a run around campus, using some equipment in the gym or yoga or high fitness class that you’re interested in. Getting a group of friends to go is sure to make your class and workout fun and something you will look forward to. Getting in a good workout has many benefits and can help break up your study sessions so that your mind doesn’t get too exhausted sitting and doing the same thing for long periods of time. Allow yourself to study for an hour, head out for a short workout, then reward yourself with your favorite treat before you head back to hitting the books. 

Keep Your Mental Health in Check

A lot of college students experience a dip in their mental health when they head off to college and are learning the ins and outs of living alone. Be aware if you’re experiencing these feelings prior to going to college that you may not have access to your primary care physician back home. So make sure before you head out you’ve received the on any medications you may need so you don’t catch yourself in a bind. If you aren’t wanting to take any medications you can make your mental health a priority by getting enough sleep, allowing time to be alone, and getting yourself out of your dorm can be a big help when it comes to your mental health. 

This first semester of college is supposed to be a fun, new experience. Don’t let anything get in your way of having a memorable time. By getting involved on campus it allows you to meet more people, find things to do that you may have missed and being able to live with some great friends that are your roommates. Getting everyone out of the dorm whether it is for grocery shopping, hitting the gym together or going to a good party with them. Getting out of the house will be really helpful and will help you stay motivated and positive through the hard times in the semester. Make sure if you need help with your mental health that you get help sooner rather than later. If you aren’t sure how you will react to a new environment it is important to be prepared and have your doctor get your prescriptions in order ahead of time so you aren’t scrambling for something when you are already struggling. Try combating these harder days for your mental health by taking some time for yourself, going out for a workout, stay hydrated and try meditating. College will be a great experience if you allow yourself to get involved with different activities on campus.

Happy studying!

Helpful Ways to Stay Sober at Parties

Going to parties when you don’t drink alcohol, either because you are trying to change your life and stop drinking alcohol or because you haven’t drunk alcohol before and don’t want some short term alcohol abuse to become a long-term problem, can be a challenging experience. If you have recently had alcohol issues, it may even be worth avoiding parties with alcohol altogether, for the moment, but that might not be realistic in the long-run. 

The good news is that there are plenty of ways you can have fun and comfortably avoiding partaking of alcohol at these parties. Friends who still drink but who are supportive of your decision to become sober can still very much be a part of your support system. It does, however, require an extra measure of caution if you are going to spend time with them. If you are in the process of overcoming alcohol addiction and have friends or family members who drink, here are some tips for staying sober.

Have a Plan in Place

It helps tremendously before attending a party, wedding, or other events to make a plan for how you will avoid temptations and pressures to drink. Decide to arm yourself with a glass of club soda from the very start, for example, and to maintain a comfortable distance between you and the refreshments table. It will also help to leave on the earlier side, before guests who are drinking start to get buzzed. You could even plan specifically to be the designated driver, which will both keep you accountable and put you in a role where no one is going to pressure you to drink.

Be Comfortable Saying No

Some ways of saying ‘no’ to alcohol work better than others. Stating that you never drink, for example, will likely cause others to probe for more answers, asking you why you have taken on such a lifestyle. For some people, they are still developing enough confidence in their sobriety that may be necessary to be comfortable expressing it. Putting it in simpler terms, however, will usually suffice. Simply tell those who ask that you’re not drinking tonight. Perhaps you’re the designated driver or are taking a prescription that interferes with alcohol; he or she won’t know. The key is to find a way to express your sobriety for the night in a way that makes you feel comfortable.

Ask a Friend to Hold You Accountable

Sometimes you may find yourself in a situation where you are surrounded by others who are drinking—at a wedding, for example. If you are unsure about your abilities to withstand the pressures to drink, confide in a close friend or family member who is a part of your support system. You could have a friend remain sober with you, or at the very least help to fend off any pressure to drink that might come.

Remember the Purpose of Your Sobriety

It helps to remind ourselves of the many positives to choosing not to drink when you are having a difficult time resisting temptation. It’s important to make this reason specific to you, personally. Maybe you don’t drink because you are trying to improve your general physical wellness and are trying to be healthier. Maybe you don’t drink because you have a history of alcohol abuse and it is critical for your mental well-being that you maintain the sobriety you’ve worked for. Remind yourself of how staying sober will benefit you physically, mentally, and financially, and think about the negative short-term consequences of drinking that you are avoiding simply by not drinking on this particular occasion.

Know Your Limits

It is important to know your limits when it comes to spending time in environments that could tempt you to pick up the drink again. Many recovering addicts who are in the early stages of recovery overestimate their abilities to resist temptations to drink, joining in on drink-centered celebrations and late-night parties. Be diligent about avoiding your triggers, and remember that this is one circumstance in which you don’t want to step outside of your comfort zone.


Redefining Balance in Your Life

Most of us need a little bit more balance in our lives. If you ever feel frazzled and you’re losing control over everything around you, you can probably relate to this need. The lack of control and balance in your life is something that happens gradually, and often you don’t realize how much balance you have lost, until you go to restore that balance. But not only do you need to restore that balance, but you need to redefine what it means to have balance in your life. If you don’t have a clear vision of the balance that your life needs, you will never be able to maintain it.

Work

When most people think about the balance of their life, work is the first thing that comes to mind. Work can look like so many different things, which is often why it is so difficult to balance out in your life. You may have a full time job that takes up most of your waking hours week after week. And many of us have a hard time truly leaving work at work, focusing on work problems and issues once we are home.

In addition to your career, there are household items that demand a lot of time, and this also constitutes work. Childcare is another thing that, while it feels unfair to label it as work, is absolutely work.

This is often just scratching the surface of the things in your life that are work. So, how is it possible to gain any balance when there are so many work related things that are pulling your attention in a hundred different directions at once? There will always be exceptions, but you should strive to have specific hours that you spend on work tasks. If you have a 9-5, leave that work there. Don’t bring projects home with you, and don’t answer emails regarding work issues when you are home. Specify certain hours that you will be doing housework. If you have hours set on a daily basis, it will be easier to keep your home clean and will not take more than your designated daily hours to keep things clean.

Down time

Down time sometimes feels like something you’ll never have again. You think back to the simple times when you were in high school, college, pre children, pre career, that you had time to do absolutely nothing. You will probably never have such an abundance of free time ever again, but that doesn’t mean that you don’t deserve to have some free time in your life. In fact, it is necessary in order for you to thrive and have an enjoyable life. Depriving yourself of free time is going to stress you out and make you less productive when you are focusing on other things. Every single day, no matter what deadlines or dishes you have, you need to let yourself take a break. Schedule it in before you start your day, so you don’t have an excuse to skip it when you are feeling overwhelmed.

Pleasure

It’s important to separate downtime from scheduled time to do things that you enjoy. Downtime should be time that you are able to sit and not worry about things. Spend that time catching up on your favorite tv show. But you should also schedule out activities of things you enjoy. Date nights, grabbing drinks with friends, brunch on the weekends, going to the movies. These won’t happen every day, but are important to have on a weekly basis.

Wellness

Your health is important, and often neglected when you are overwhelmed and busy. It doesn’t take a lot of time to plan out healthy meals for your week, but it’s important to do so, and to stick to it. Finding time to be active and workout, even if it is just going on a walk in the evening with your dog, will improve the quality of your life, and you’ll find that you have more energy for other things during the days.

Questions to Ask Yourself Before Going Back to School

Going back to school is a dream that many people have, nowadays. There are many reasons for this. For some people, they may not have even pursued higher education in the first place (not that there’s anything wrong with that), others may have left school to pursue a job opening or family goals, and others still may have gotten their degree in a field that isn’t bringing them the happiness or success that they crave.

Regardless of the reason, going back to school can be a great way to shift the current priorities of your life, but it has many drawbacks of whether it is feasible financially or timewise. Here are questions you should be asking yourself before you go back to school…

Will It Let Your Pursue a Career That Makes You Happier?

First of all, consider the reason that you are going back to school. One of the most valid reasons to go back to school is because it will enable you to get a job in a field that brings you far more happiness.

This happiness can come in different forms. Maybe you got a degree in accounting, but find that you hate the day-to-day work more than anything else and want to switch to a career where you can use your hands more. In this example, happiness comes from a desire to enjoy the actual work being done. Other times, getting a degree to work in a more lucrative industry may help bring happiness in the form of additional income. Consider what happiness looks like to you, and whether going back to school is a realistic way to achieve that happiness.

Does It Make Financial Sense?

Unfortunately, the biggest roadblock to going back to school for most people is whether or not it is financially viable. There’s no getting around it, school is expensive. Aside from medical debt, student debt is one of the most common forms of debt that drive people to declare bankruptcy. For some career paths, though, it’s simply not realistic to break into specific industries without an applicable degree. The good news, though, is that there are several key cost-saving measures to consider, listed below.

Is There an Online Option?

When you go back to school, you’re paying a premium price for instructors, buildings, facilities, amenities, additional staff, potential housing, and lots more. Online schooling options are able to cut out a lot of extraneous costs because there are fewer upkeep and startup costs per class, and thus they tend to be significantly less expensive than attending school on a physical campus. So you should consider if there is an online option that makes sense for the degree you are seeking to attain.

Is a Tech School Right?

People’s idea of higher education is often tied to a traditional 4-year college, but this isn’t the only option. Tech schools provide fast-tracked programs to work in a variety of advanced trades and technical industries. They are also available for a fraction of the price, and can almost always be done in less than two years, if not 6 months. This makes tech school a more affordable and realistic option for many people.

Will Your Work Pay for Your School?

Another way to make the option of going back to school more financially feasible is to see if your work is willing to help you pay the cost of attaining a higher degree. If you are going back to school to further excel in your current career field, then your employer has a vested interest in your training. Some companies already have programs set up to help their employees do this, but if that doesn’t currently exist, it might be worth starting a dialogue with your employer to see if that is a possibility.

Can You Learn the Same Skills Outside of School?

While higher education is a terrific way to develop an understanding of complex concepts and get training in many fields, there are some industries where you can get equal or superior training by learning on the job. If this option is open to you, you should do a quick cost-benefit analysis to determine if your specific goals are better met by jumping right into the field you want to work in, rather than going to school first.